gothicmarshmallon
My Pages  
  Home
  blog
  The girl
  Links and suchlike
  Labels
  => Perkygoff
  => Baby Bat
  => Cybergoth
  => Guro Lolita
  => Shiro Lolita
  => Lolita
  => Ginger
  => Otaku
  => Anime Fan
  => Yaoi Fan
  => Anti-fashion Kid
  => Gothic Lolita
  => Sci-fi Fan
  => Steampunk Lolita
  => Sweet Lolita
  => Nerdfighter
  => Hippie
  => Fangirl
  => Punk Lolita
  => Aristocrat
  => Internet Addict
  => Neo-Victorian
  => Romantigoth
  => Geek
  => Steampunk
  => Jock
  => Bosozoku
  => Cosplay Lolita
  => Sailor Lolita
  => Casual Lolita
  => Cat Lady
  => Goth
  => Rock and roller
  => Gothabilly
  => Country Lolita
  => Weeaboo
  => Office Lady
  => Sukeban
  => Meido
  => Hime Lolita
  => Kodona
  => Cosplayer
  => Scene Kid
  => Mopeygoth
  => Ganguro
  => Emo
  => Kuro Lolita
  => Deathrocker
  => GeekGoth
  => Victorian Goth
  => Wa Lolita
  => Girly Girl
  => Punk
  => Oshare kei Fan
  => Furry
  => Cam Whore
  => Himegyaru
  => Pop Punk
  => Skater
  => Decora
  => Dr Who Fan
  => Twilighter
  => Browncoat
  => Fanboy
  => Genki Kid
  => Wizard Rocker
  => Teenybopper
  => Rivethead
  => Visual kei Fan
  => Pirate Lolita
  => Akibakei
  => Gamer
  => Tomboy
  => Tolkien Fan
  => Bohemian
  => Randomer
  => Hipster
  => Jesus Freak
  => Gyaru
  => CorpGoth
  => Fairy-kei
  => Angura kei Fan
  => Techie
  => Chav
  => Harry Potter Fan
  => Metalhead
  => Anorak
  => Japanese Schoolgirl
  => Straight edger
  => Juggalo
  => Athlete
  => Ero Lolita
  => Elegant Gothic Lolita
  => Fantasy Fan
  => Sorority Sister [slash] Frat Boy
  => Seinen Fan
  => Hip Hopper
  => Dandy
  => Trekkie
  => Shojo Fan
  => Loner
  => Bimbo
  => Madam
  => Nerd
  => Elegant Gothic Aristocrat
  => Preppy
  => Qi Lolita
  => Hillbilly
  => Drama Kid
  => Azn
  => Valley Girl
  => Bookworm
  => Otherkin
  => Preppy-scene kid
  => Swing Kid
  => Riot Grrrl
  => Cutie
  => Rennie
  => Grunger
  => Surfer
  => Raver
  => Hippy-goth
  => LGBT
  => Nakama
  => Rasta
  => Wota
  => Hikikomori
  => Meganekko
  => Powerpop Kid
  => Indie kid
  => Weirdo
  => TradGoth
  => 80s kid
  => Kegadoru
  => Artsy Kid
  => Miko
  => Dork
  => Vampire goth
  => Wigger
  => Stoner
  => Cabaret Goth
  => RnB Kid
  => New Age Spiritualist
  => Country and Westerner
  => Fashion Victim
  => Vampire Lifestyler
  => GlitterGoth
  => Nip Hopper
  => Slut
  => Alternative kid
  => Skinhead
  => Geek-chic
  => Pop Kid
  => Music Junkie
  => Rocker
  => Band kid
  => Gangsta
  => Beatnik
  => Boho-chic
  => Decora Lolita
  => Cheerleader
  => Twins
  => Foodie
  => J-goth
  => Ditz
  => Goody Goody
  => History Buff
  => Medieval Goth
  => Glam rocker
  => Kigurumin
  => New Romantic
  => Kawaiiko
  => Popular kid
  => Kandi kid
  => Babydoll goth
  => Kinderwhore
  => Clingy Jealous Girl
  => Disco Fan
  => Biker
  => Drama queen
  => J.A.P
  => FRUiTS Kid
  => Techno kid
  => Ahni
  => Class Clown
  => Jailbait
  => Popcore Kid
  => Prep
  => Boy Next Door
  => Yuri Fan
  => Girl Next Door
  => Br00tal Kid
  => Halloweencore Goth
  => RPGer
  => Eccentric
  => Nu-metal Kid
  => J-Techno Kid
  => Kook
  => Bubblegum Kid
  => Rainbow Brite
  => Space Cadet
  => Strange girl
  => Trendie
  => Cuteness Freak
  => Romantichic
  => Ska Kid
  => Eclectic Kid
  => Classic Lolita
  => Country pop kid
  => Danny Phantom Fan
  => Weird Fan
  => Perky Kid
  => Halloweentown Kid
  => Neo-punk
  => Harajuku Kid
  => Aspie
  => Kooky-chic
  => Casual Kid
  => Emopunk
  => Unlabeled Kid
  => Rock Gyaru
  => Normie
  => Phantom of the Opera Fan
  => Colorful bohemian
  => Rock chic
  => Loser
  => Fantasy goth
  => Outcast
  => Dude
  => Williamsburg Kid
  => Kogal
  => Shota boy
  => J-pop kid
  => Fetish Goth
  => Adult Child
  => Kindergoth
  => LARPer
  => Alternative 80s Kid
  => Petrolhead
  => Casual gamer
  => Haruhiist
  => Baka
  => Electro Kid
  => Art Dork
  => Sports fanatic
  => Baka Gamer
  => Ladette
  => Indie Pop Kid
  => Emogoth
  => Fearie Goth
  => Rainbow Goth
  => Superchick
  => Faery Folk
  => Aquamarine Kid
  => Glitter Freak
  => Edgy Hippie
  => Kote Kid
  => Metal Goth
  => Ether Goth
  => Ethereal kid
  => Girl Power Kid
  => Glamour Kid
  => J-bubblegum Kid
  => Colorful-chic
  => Posh Snob
  => Modern Kid
  => Skate punk
  => Brainiac
  => Kawaii Scenester
  => Sophistichic
  => White goth
  => Kawaii Fan
  => Lamer
  => Flaming Uke
  => Dreamer-chic
  => Neohippie
  => Modern Princess
  => RENThead
  => Avatard
  => Udoli
  => Casual-chic
  => Badass Uke
  => Pro-Ana
  => Beach-prep
  => Japanophile
  => Scene Hippie
  => Punktorian
  => Urban Rebel
  => Horror Punk
  => Ulzzang
  => Exotic Ethnic Kid
  => Gypsy Punk
  => Sleeper
  => Ero Kokoii Kid
  => Gypsy-chic
  => Day Dreamer
  => Erokawa
  => Sweetheart
  => Granary Kid
  => Chibi Seme
  => Hardcore Punk
  => Gypsy Goth
  => Occult Goth
  => Moekko
  => Clueless Uke
  => Rollergirl
  => Dreamer
  => Innocent Uke
  => Funky Kid
  => Maho Shoujo
  => Crayola Kid
  => Electroclash Kid
  => Starkidd
  => Babydoll
  Yami no Guestbook. ^^
  Randomness
  Sana's polls of DOOM!!!!
  Sana's newsletter
  F.A.Q
  Sana's forum
Rennie
Rennie

Rennie is a term for a participant in a renaisance faire, although some use the term to refer to other forms of reinactment or even LARP as well.

A Renaissance fair, Renaissance faire, or Renaissance festival is an outdoor weekend gathering, usually held in the United States, open to the public and generally commercial in nature, which emulates a historic period for the amusement of its guests.

Some are permanent theme parks, others are short-term events in fairgrounds or other large public or private spaces
. Renaissance fairs generally include an abundance of costumed entertainers, musical and theatrical acts, art and handicrafts for sale, and festival food. Some even offer camping, for those who wish to stay more than one day.

Most Renaissance fairs are set during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. Some are set earlier, during the reign of Henry VIII, or in other countries, such as France, and some include broader definitions of the Renaissance which include earlier periods, such as the Vikings, or later, such as 18th Century pirates, and some engage in deliberate "time travel" by encouraging participants to wear costumes representing several eras in a broad time period.

Renaissance fairs encourage visitors to enter into the spirit of things with costumes and audience participation. Most tolerate, and many welcome, fantasy elements such as wizards and elves.

Chicago journalist Neil Steinberg said (of the Bristol Renaissance Faire), "If theme parks, with their pasteboard main streets, reek of a bland, safe, homogenized, whitebread America, the Renaissance Faire is at the other end of the social spectrum, a whiff of the occult, a flash of danger and a hint of the erotic. Here, they let you throw axes. Here are more beer and bosoms than you'll find in all of Disney World."

Most Renaissance fairs are arranged to represent an imagined village in England during the reign of Elizabeth I, as this period has been generally considered to correspond to the flowering of the English Renaissance.

In a modern Renaissance festival there are stages or performance areas set up for scheduled shows, such as plays in Shakespearean or commedia dell' arte tradition, as well as anachronistic audience participation comedy routines. Other performances include dancers, magicians, musicians, jugglers, and singers.

Between the stages the streets ('lanes') are lined with stores ('shoppes') and stalls where independent vendors sell medieval and Renaissance themed handcrafts, clothing, books, and artworks. There are food and beverage vendors, as well as game and ride areas.

Games include basic skills events such as archery or axe-throwing as well as Drench-a-Wench and Soak-a-Bloke, which allow a player with a good aim to hit a target and get a fair employee wet. Rides are typically unpowered—various animal rides and human-powered swings are common. Live animal displays and falconry exhibitions are also commonplace. Larger Renaissance fairs will often include a joust as a main attraction.

In addition to the staged performances, a major attraction of Renaissance fairs is the crowds of actors - both professional and amateur - who play all sorts of historical figures and roam the fair, interacting with visitors. Visitors are encouraged to wear costumes, once any weapons are suitably peace-bonded, contributing to the illusion of an actual Renaissance environment. Many of the fair vendors sell or rent costumes for all ages and types. The Renaissance fair subculture's word for these costumed guests is "playtrons", a portmanteau of the words "patron" and "player", and they add a second level of enjoyment to their experience by "getting into the act" as Renaissance Lords and ladies, peasants, pirates, belly dancers, or fantasy characters.

Most fairs have an end-of-the-day ritual, a parade or concert where all employees gather and bid farewell to the patrons. For those who work at the fair, the last concert that a festival holds for the season is traditionally an emotional moment.

Renaissance fairs are staged around the United States at different times of the year. Fair vendors, participants and crew often work the "faire circuit", going from event to event as one fair ends and another begins. They often camp on-site or nearby and develop close bonds with their fellow performers.

Although historical reenactments are by no means exclusive to the United States (for example, the Earl of Eglinton in Scotland sponsored a large tournament as early as 1839), the Renaissance Fair is, arguably, a uniquely American variation on the theme, having as much the flavor of an amusement park combined with a shopping mall as of a historical reenactment. European historical fairs, on the other hand, seem more on the living history museum model, where an actual historic site is peopled by re-enactors whose job it is to explain historical life to modern visitors. American Renaissance fair patrons may be as interested in drinking, eating, shopping, and watching farce as they are in an educational experience. Since the mid-1990s, American-style Renaissance fairs have been spreading into Canada.

The first American fair, The Renaissance Pleasure Faire (Agoura, CA) was originally designed by the Living History Center to resemble an actual spring market fair of the period. Many of the original booths were no-charge reenactments of historical activities such as printing presses, and blacksmiths. The first commercial vendors were mostly artisans and food merchants and were required to demonstrate historical accuracy or plausibility for their wares. Whole groups of volunteers were organized into "guilds" to focus on specific reenactment duties (musicians, military, celtic clans, peasants, etc). Both actors and vendors were required to successfully complete workshops in period language/accents, costuming and culture and to stay "in character" while working. Fairs that copied the original frequently did not attempt such historical accuracy and in 1995 new management and economic pressures negatively altered the original fair's historical quality as well.

The jousting and swordplay on exhibit in most Renaissance fairs is not real combat. As with professional wrestling, these "fights" are often carefully scripted mock combat. The weapons are real, but the participants are skilled, trained actors and stunt performers. Some jousting troupes, however, do perform real lance passes (using real pine lances).

Although the stocks and pillories displayed in some Renaissance fairs look alarming, they are not actually functional. They are provided for amusing photo opportunities and for entirely fictional stunt acts by professional actors.

Acts at a Renaissance fair usually have years of skill behind them and are highly choreographed, taking weeks of classes and, in some respects, years of practice in order to make it appear as authentic as possible.

Renaissance fairs have several variant names, many of which use old-fashion styled spellings such as "faire" or "fayre". These historically inaccurate spellings likely originate from the Middle English variant of the Anglo-Franc word "Feyre". They can also be referred to as "Elizabethan", "Medieval", or "Tudor" fairs (or fayres). "Ren Fair" and "Ren Fest" are popular colloquialisms.

It is unsuprising that Rennies typically have a huge sense of history, and are often spotted in museums. However, unlike the typical history buff, Rennies want to experiance the period rather than learn about it, and aren't to concerned with historical accuracy. They are often in-character at all times, wearing costumes, talking in shakespearian, and mixing georgian chants in with regular music.

Image from Deviantart, info -save for the last paragraph, which is mine- from wikipedia.



You're late for class. Oh noes!  
   
Advertisement  
   
Today, there have been 1 visitors (6 hits) on this page!
=> Do you also want a homepage for free? Then click here! <=